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Sunday, October 27, 2013

How to use 'NEED' in Sentences as an Auxiliary Verb?

Last lesson dealt in our free MT course blog was about how to use 'ought to' as an auxiliary verb. In this post we would learn about a new topic of auxiliary verb ‘need’.  Need is a verb and an auxiliary, by using need in any tense needed is used in any tense with the appropriate auxiliary. Use of need as an auxiliary:  1. When we want to give the meaning ‘necessity or importance or obligation’ in a sentence. 2. In the question forms usually. Some of the rules and regulations of this auxiliary verb are: 1. In the simple present tense the auxiliary ‘need’ is used in the present form of the verb. 2. In the present continuous tense the auxiliary ‘need be’ is used in the present ending in –ing  form of the verb. 3. In the future in the past tense, the auxiliary ‘need have’ is used in the past participle form of the verb. 4. In the future in the past continuous tense, the auxiliary ‘need have been’ is used in the present in –ing form of the verb. Whenever the sentence of the structure is in the present tense, then the following examples are given below:

    1. Need You tell him anything more?
  1. She needn’t tell him anything more?
  2. Scott need not return to this Office next year.
  3. Need you all go to a museum on Christmas day?
 (Using of ‘need ‘ in the sentence sounds very polite and diplomatic when compared to ‘should’ which is appropriate
5. We needn’t go to the function today.
6. Need I get up from bed so early on a holiday morning?
7. She needs to tell us more on this subject.
8. Samson needs to return to meeting next year.
9. We need to go to the movie today.
In all the above sentences, need has become a verb When ‘need’ is used as a verb we are forced or compelled to use an infinitive-verb.

Whenever the sentence of the structure is in present continuous tense, then some of the examples of the sentences are given below:
1. Need you be doing this assignment all by yourself?
2. I needn’t be going to the function today.
3. I needn’t be doing this assignment at all.
4. He needn’t be interfering with your family matters at all.
5. She needn’t be doing this work at all.
6. I needn’t be going to the movie today.

NOTE: By using simple present tense ‘need’. So, this auxiliary is not normally used in the continuous tense although by rule we can.

Whenever the structure of the sentence is in future in the past continuous, then the examples of the sentences are given below.
1. Need Alex have beaten up this child so badly for a simple mistake?
2. She need not have beaten up the child at all.
3. I needn’t have attended the class at all today.
4. Need they have purchased so many dresses?
5. They needn’t have purchased more than 5 sets.

Whenever the structure of the sentence is in future in the past continuous tense then the  examples of the sentences are given below.
1. The students need not have been running after the money-lender for this loan.

In the next post we would learn about a new topic of auxiliary verb ‘DARE’.

Monday, October 21, 2013

How to use 'OUGHT TO' in sentences as an Auxiliary Verb?

Last lesson in our free MT course blog dealt about the usage of 'MUST' as an auxiliary verb. Now we will see about the uses of  “Ought to”: 1. To show or express duty or obligation (Ought to is stronger than Must) or expectations. 2. It is used in the future in the past tense.  Some of the rules for ought to are: 1. In simple present tense this auxiliary ‘ought to’ is used in the present form of the verb. 2. In present continuous tense this auxiliary ‘ought to be’ is used in the verb in the present form of –ing. 3. In future in the past tense this auxiliary ‘ought to have’ is used in the verb in the past participle of the verb.  4. In future in the past continuous tense this auxiliary ‘ought to have been’ is used in the verb in the present ending in –ing form. Whenever the sentence of the structure expresses duty or obligation, then some of the examples of the structures of the sentences are given below.

1. The passengers ought to report at the enquiry office in the arrival of the train. (This is in simple present tense form)
2. We ought to be leaving the station now.
3. The spectators ought not to go beyond this line. (This is in simple present tense form)
4. The teacher ought to be advising her students frequently about the discipline. (This is in present continuous tense form)
5. All of us ought to render help to orphanage. (This is in simple present tense form).
6. This film ought to do well at the box office. (This is in expectation-simple present tense form).

Whenever the sentence of the structure represents future in the past, then some of the examples of the structures of the sentences are given below.
1. You ought to have gone to the drama hall for the reception ceremony.
2. They ought not to have violated the college rules and regulations.
3. The week students ought not to have been spending much time on playing games. (This is in the future in the past continuous tense form)
4. The doctors ought to have looked after the patients better.
In the next post we would learn about a new topic of auxiliary verb ‘need’ in the sentences.

Friday, October 18, 2013

How to use 'MUST' in sentences as an Auxiliary Verb?

In the series of learning medical transcription course, we dealt about 'WOULD' usage in the prior lesson. Now we will study about the use of MUST as an auxiliary verb in English grammar.  Uses of  ‘must’: 1. Must is used as an auxiliary to show duty or obligation (Here ‘must’ is stronger than ‘should’) 2. Must is used in future in the past tense. Let us come to know certain rules which is used in the tense of auxiliary form of the verb. A. In the simple present tense form the auxiliary ‘must’ is used in the present form of the verb. B. In the present continuous tense form the auxiliary ‘mustbe’ is used in the present form ending with –ING. C. In the future in the past tense the auxiliary ‘must have’ is used in the past participle form. D. In the future in the past continuous tense ‘must have been’ is used in the present form ending in –ing.

Whenever the structure of the sentence expresses duty or obligation, the structures is shown as below examples: 1. We must obey the office rules and regulations faithfully. (This is in the simple present tense) 2. We must not work against the interests of others. (This is in simple present tense) 3. Must we visit all the schools in this town everyday? (This is in simple present tense) 4. We must not be waiting for too long. (This is in the present continuous tense) 5. You must speak to the prinicipal today itself, mustn’t you? (This is in simple present tense).

Note: The short form of ‘must not’ is mustn’t. Here the silent letter is first t, so we pronounce the word as musn’t

Whenever the structure of the sentence is in the form of ‘future in the past’ then the examples are shown below: 1. Elizabeth must have set a record by now in modeling.
2. All teachers mustn’t have gone for meeting today. Some must have stayed behind.
3. The doctor have been examining the patient when you called at my clinic. (This is in the future in the past continuous tense) 4. All the members in our family must have returned from vacation by today.

In the next post  we would learn about a new topic of auxiliary verb 'OUGHT TO' in the sentences.

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

How to use 'WOULD' in sentences as Auxiliary Verb?

Last post in our free medical transcription course dealt about the usage of SHOULD as an auxiliary verb.  This post aims to define the use of WOULD in the structure of sentences as shown.  Whenever the sentence of the structure is in the past equivalent of will in complex sentences, for that instance the examples are shown below. 1. Steve answered that he would be 40 next December. 2. The Lab Assistant promised that he would take a decision soon on our records to the training course. 3. You would tell me when you received your convocation certificate, wouldn’t you? 4. Didn’t you reply the Principal that the students would copy the answer sheet, Wouldn’t you? 5. You wouldn't return to your room until you had finished your office work, would you? 

Whenever the sentence of the structure is used in ‘regular habit of present time or past time’, for that instance the examples are shown below. 1. Your dog would play with my small sister every morning. (This tense is in the past and present habit). 2. This stray cat would come to my house every evening for the left over milk. (This tense is in the past and present habit). 3. That uncle would meet my family during every summer vacation. (This tense is in the past habit of action). 4. This member would come to temple only on Independence day. (This tense is in the past habit of action).

Whenever the sentence of the structure is used in ‘stronger form of determination’, for that instance the examples are shown below. 1. I would talk to the Owner tomorrow itself. (This is in simple present tense). 2. Your daughter wouldn’t talk to me at all about her personal problem. (This is in simple present tense). 3. My children would never cheat in any examination. (This is in simple present tense). 4. Wouldn’t you say sorry to Williams and shake hand with him? This is in simple present tense).

In the next post we would learn some more about ‘would’.

Monday, October 14, 2013

How to use 'SHOULD' and 'WOULD' as an Auxiliary Verb ?

Our blog for free MT course explained about how to use SHOULD as an auxiliary verb in English language.  In this post we would learn about the remaining topic of ‘should’ as an auxiliary. ‘Should’ as an auxiliary is used the structure of the sentence as for the surprise or annoyance. Some of the examples are: 1. How should you know where mother keeps the provisions? (This is in the Simple Present form). 2. Why should I know anything about Leukemia? (This is in the Simple Present form). 3. Why should I keep this book when he gives a bunch of papers related to the topic completely? (This is in the Simple Present form).  Whenever the sentence structure has the form of probability or expectations, the examples are 1. The students should be in their college now. (This is in the simple present form) (Be is used as verb here). 2. You should not reject formal invitations from seniors. (This is in the simple present form). 3. At this time, the Examiner should be going rounds on his duty for inspection. (This is in the Present continuous form). 4. Shouldn’t you give an apology for her rudeness. (This is in the Simple present form). 5. Shouldn’t you have sent your condolences when you heard about your grandma’s sudden death? (This is in the future in the past tense form).

Whenever the sentence structure has the form of What is advisable, some of the examples are given below 1. She should eat her meal when it is warm. (This is in the simple present form). 2. Everyone should feed when the sun shines. (This is in the simple present form).

3. We should not take advantage of someone’s helplessness. (This is in the simple present form). 4. Shouldn’t you help those in trouble or problems? (This is in the simple present form). 5. We should donate blood to the people who are in need of blood, shouldn’t we?

In the next post we would also learn about the remaining topic dealing with an auxiliary ‘WOULD’.

Thursday, October 10, 2013

How to use SHOULD as an auxiliary in English?

In this lesson we would learn about the uses of ‘should’ as an auxiliary. 'Should' is used as follows: 1. This is used as the past equivalent of shall in sentences like complex sentences. Although, ‘shall’ is a future tense auxiliary, for issuing a command or order we use this ‘should’ in simple present tense or acknowledging it. 2. It is also used to express or exhibit duty or obligation on one’s part. 3. When we want to say, what is advisable in certain or particular situations or circumstances. 4. When expressing duty or obligation on one’s part. 5. It is also used in the ‘future in the past’ tense. 6. It is also used in simple present tense interrogatives to express surprise or annoyance.

There are some rules regarding this auxiliary ‘should. They are: 1. In the simple present tense, the auxiliary ‘should’ is used in the verb of the present form. 2. In the present continuous tense, the auxiliary ‘should be’ is used in the verb of the present form. 3. In the future in the past tense, the auxiliary ‘should have’ is used in the verb of the past participle form. 4. In the future in the past continuous tense, the auxiliary ‘should have been’ is used in the verb of the present form ending with –ing.

Now we would come across the above conditions in the structural sentences.
When ever the sentence structure has past equivalent of shall, the examples are:
1. I asked the class teacher whether the students should wait or leave.
2. My daughter made sure that my husband should not hear the bad news.
3. The HR warned us that we should not repeat such mistakes.
4. Shouldn’t you have informed the couple earlier that they were going to make their breakfast in the Star Hotel?

Whenever the sentence structure has for duty/obligation in simple present tense, the examples are:
1. We should obey the rules of the job without exception.
(This is in the simple present tense form)
2. You should keep your words in true always.
(This is in the simple present tense form)
3. The children should not look at the films beyond 9 p.m.
(This is in the simple present form)
4. Young boys and girls should play games regularly.
(This is in the simple present form)
5. The Principal should be reading the newspaper now.
(This is in the present continuous form).

In the next lesson we would learn the remaining topic of ‘should’ as an auxiliary.

Ok…………..

Tags: english grammar modal, auxiliary verb english, auxiliary verb in english, auxiliary verbs english, grammar modal verb, grammar modal verbs, verb should, modal verb should, should verb, auxiliary verbs in english, should modal verb

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Friday, October 4, 2013

How to use COULD as an auxiliary in English?

We use this auxiliary ‘could’ in many cases. 1. In as the past equivalent of ‘can’ in complex sentence. 2. In past tense for past actions. 3. The term ‘could’ is more polite than ‘may’ which is used for making polite requests in simple present tense and future tense. 4. In simple present tense for purpose of ability or possibility. 5. In future in the past tense this ‘could’ is used.

Let us come to know about some rules of tenses where this ‘could’ be used.
1. For simple present tense in the present form of the verb the auxiliary is ‘could’.
2. For present continuous tense in the present-in-ing form of the verb the auxiliary is ‘could be’.
3. For future tense in the present form of the verb the auxiliary is ‘could’.
4. For future continous tense in the present-in-ing form of the verb the auxiliary is ‘could be’.
5. For simple past tense in the present form of the verb the auxiliary is ‘could’.
6. For future in the past tense in the past participle form of the verb the auxiliary is ‘could have’.
7. For future in the past continuous tense in the present-in-ing form of the verb the auxiliary is ‘could have been’.

Structure of sentence: as past equivalent of CAN
1. In the past equivalent of ‘can’, in complex sentences we use ‘could’ as shown below in the examples.
a. She did not solve that problem because she could not follow the steps of instructions.
b. Could you sleep for a while because it is raining heavily today?
c. Could you give me a party dress for the function which is held in the evening?

Structure of sentence: For actions in the past
1. I could not write this answer. (simple past)
2. Lakshmi could not go to office last week. (simple past)
3. The mechanic could not repair my car till yesterday. (simple past)
4. I could hear some strange voice in your room last night. (simple past)
The sentence above is also written by somebody like this ‘I heard some strange voice----‘ but when some ability is required to hear a faint voice in the past time we use ‘could’ as equal to the present tense ‘can’.
5. Could you meet the vice-principal yesterday? (simple past)

In the next lesson we would learn some more about ‘COULD’

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Tuesday, October 1, 2013

How to use MIGHT in the Future in the Past Tense...?

Structure of a sentence: Future in the past tense

In the total 14 tenses we covered only two time periods they are 1. Present Perfect tense and  2. Present Perfect Continuous tense. Now in this post we will learn about simple future tense which is used in the past. In this type of sentences for an action we have in mind; action has not started; action will take place only at a future time. So when we frame a sentence like “I will launch a program tomorrow”, in which we look into the future from the present time.

In other case, we imagine that we live in the past time period and see towards the future, from that past time point, so that action is in our mind only. We call such a tense as Future in the past tense.

Some of the examples which show the time period in which the auxiliary for this tense is “might have” and the verb in the PP form.
1. This problem might have solved if you had written in step by step method. (future in the past tense).
2. The boss might have suspended you for such misbehavior. (future in the past tense).
3. She might have attended the function even if she had received your invitation.
4. What might have been the reasons for her suicide? (future in the past tense).
5. I might have been using this pen if it had been with me. (future in the past continuous tense).
6. Who might have been misleading my children? (future in the past continuous tense).
7. We might not have studied this case even if the Collector had asked us.
8. All of us might have taken part in the festival if the villagers had been taken interest to us.

In the next post we would learn about “COULD”.

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The Longest Medical Word

Today, we will know about an interesting medical term in medical language. This post is just to know about a different thing in the medica...