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Tuesday, June 8, 2010

COMPACT BONE AND CANCELLOUS BONE - LESSON 202

In this lesson we will learn more about the structure of the bone about the two layers of the bone.  They are compact bone and cancellous bone.  Now we will about one bye one now. Okay.

Compact bone is also known as cortical bone is a layer of hard, dense tissue that lies under the periosteum in all bones and chiefly around the diaphysis of a along bones. The blood vessels are located within the compact bone which are the system of small canals that bring oxygen and nutrients to the bone and remove waste products such as carbondioxide. The haversian canals are located in the compact bone. The compact bone is tunneled out in the shaft of the long bones by a central medullary cavity which contains yellow bone marrow. This yellow bone marrow is chiefly composed of fat cells.

Trabecular bone or spongy bone or cancellous bone:  This bone is to a great extent less dense and more porous comparing the compact or cortical bone.  This is made up of trabeculae or a spongy latticework.  This is found mostly in the epiphysis regions of the long bone and also in the central segment of the most bones of the body.  Red bone marrow is the thing that fills the spaces in the cancellous bone.  Comparing yellow marrow in compact bone, red marrow is supplied with blood and this is a fatty tissue matter.  Red bone marrow consists of both mature and immature blood cells in different phases of growth.  In the bones of the ribs, sternum or breastbone, pelvic bone, and vertebrae bones, and also in the epiphyses of the long bones, red bone marrow is filled within the cancellous tissue.  But red bone marrow is abundant in young children than the adults.  The amount of red bone marrow decreases when the young children become adults and this is replaced by the yellow bone marrow.

In the next lesson we will learn about the Bone Processes.  Okay.

Come on.

To go to the next lesson from here please click the link below.